BIOGRAPHY LEONARD KLEINROCK, INVENTOR INTERNET TECHNOLOGY

Leonard Kleinrock is a world-renowned scientist, his invention is very beneficial to human life today. His invention is an Internet technology. Its invention facilitates human activity in communicating and seeking information, all of which is really useful and necessary for human life at this time.

BIOGRAPHY LEONARD KLEINROCK, INVENTOR INTERNET TECHNOLOGY
Leonard Kleinrock
Leonard Kleinrock was born on June 13, 1934 in the city of New York, USA. He has a considerable interest in the world of technology. His interest brought him into one of the schools in the United States, focusing in the world of technology, the Bronx High School of Science in 1951.

At the school, Leonard Kleinrock honed his talent in the field of technology, not infrequently he often experiments on computer networks contained in the school is just to hone his talent.

Graduated from Bronx High School of Science, Leonard Klienrock continued his studies at City College of New York, majoring in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. In 1957, he received a Bachelor's Degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from City College of New York.

In 1959 and 1961, Leonard Klienrock made a paper that contained a packet exchange in relation to the technology package.

After graduating from City College of New York, Leonard Klienrock continued his studies to a higher level, the master's program. He entered the Massachusetts Institute of Technology by taking the same field as before, namely Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. In 1963, he successfully graduated and received a master's and doctorate (Ph.D.).

Invenor Internet
After completing his lecture, Leonard Kleinrock joined the lecturer at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). There he was interested in computer network systems increasingly felt. There he became professor of computer science majoring in Engineering and Applied Science. From this place the greatest discovery of the Internet was born.

Leonard Kleinrock had started discovering and developing the internet when he was in college. Exactly when he was undergoing his master's program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He wrote it in a paper about the science of computer networks that eventually the paper became the basic concept of the internet.

In this paper he describes the possibility of the exchange of data packets between one computer device to another through a global network that is global. At that time he still did not find the technique, but when he entered the UCLA then he managed to find a digital data packet solving technique that can be sent through a computer network.

Arpanet is a computer network created by the Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) of the US Department of Defense in 1969, which functioned as a means of experimenting the latest computer network technology of its time.

Arpanet's first message was sent by UCLA, student programmer Charley Kline, on October 29, 1969. He was mentored by Leonard Kleinrock performing the first transmission using network technology called the Internet.

At that time, they were conducting a transmission from UCLA to the Stanford Research Institute which was also the site of the Arpanet program development. At first he planned to send a transmission of a word, "LOGIN", but the connection was lost just before the letter "G", so only 2 letters were sent, "LO", which appeared on the screen at Standord Research Institute, miles.

Although the first experiment still failed, but Leonard Kleinrock was happy that he had successfully transmitted remotely through the world's first computer network. Since after the first experiment, Arpanet's development has been optimized and has even gained remarkable responses from the government through a program, the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). In 1988, Leonard Kleinrock became chairman of the National Research network group for the US Congress.

Leonard Kleinrock has earned several awards for his dedication to the internet world. On September 29, 2008, he received the National of Sciense award, a nation's scientific honor from President George W. Bush at the White House and also awarded The 2007 National Medal of Science over modern mathematical data network theory, and packet switching functional specifications.

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